5 Comments

  1. Avatar Sandra Panici
    December 9, 2017 @ 3:01 am

    Hi John,
    should I Not wear my black Juventus T-shirt on the streets of Rome? I bought it some years ago on the Adriatic and love it cause it’s a soft cloth, has a stylish fit and is a beautiful dressy top.

    There is an AS ROMA store near me on Via Appia Nuova, walking from Re di Roma Metro to Ponte Lungo Metro. If wearing AS ROMA gear would endear me more to Romans, I’ll wear it cause I need All the help I can get in this city. What are your thoughts on this?

    Reply

  2. Avatar Sandra Panici
    December 9, 2017 @ 3:01 am

    Hi John,
    should I Not wear my black Juventus T-shirt on the streets of Rome? I bought it some years ago on the Adriatic and love it cause it’s a soft cloth, has a stylish fit and is a beautiful dressy top.

    There is an AS ROMA store near me on Via Appia Nuova, walking from Re di Roma Metro to Ponte Lungo Metro. If wearing AS ROMA gear would endear me more to Romans, I’ll wear it cause I need All the help I can get in this city. What are your thoughts on this?

    Reply

  3. Avatar Bruce Radford
    February 1, 2018 @ 1:20 pm

    John:

    Am an American, live in Washington, DC, and a football fan (Calcio, the real football). I follow the English Premier league mostly, but occasionally take a peak a what’s happening in Serie A.

    FYI — am sending you a link to an article that appeared lately in the Manchester Guardian. Written by an English football fan, about why he finds it unsatisfying to try to watch Italian football on TV with English-language commentary — because that lacks the piquant aspects of the true Italian language commentary.

    Here’s the link — https://www.theguardian.com/football/these-football-times/2018/jan/25/italian-football-premier-league-serie-a-language

    A wonderful, beautiful piece about the soul of Italian football. Be sure to take a look.

    Best, Bruce

    Reply

    • John Henderson John Henderson
      February 2, 2018 @ 1:03 am

      Thanks, Bruce. I look forward to reading it. However, the writer must keep in mind that you must be pretty fluent in Italian to understand Italian soccer commentary. I watch Serie A on TV for language skills but it’s very frustrating. The English-language broadcasters are very knowledgeable and give me insight and history that would normally be lost on me. The problem with Serie A is it’s, well, boring. Compared to Premiership where the attack is emphasized more than defense, Serie A just plods along with teams afraid to make a mistake. They’re all following the lead of Juventus which has always had an iron-clad defense. But they pay the price. My Roma has now collected only three points in its last six games. They can’t score. And they’re getting booed off the field, and rightfully so.

      Reply

  4. Avatar Bruce Radford
    February 1, 2018 @ 1:20 pm

    John:

    Am an American, live in Washington, DC, and a football fan (Calcio, the real football). I follow the English Premier league mostly, but occasionally take a peak a what’s happening in Serie A.

    FYI — am sending you a link to an article that appeared lately in the Manchester Guardian. Written by an English football fan, about why he finds it unsatisfying to try to watch Italian football on TV with English-language commentary — because that lacks the piquant aspects of the true Italian language commentary.

    Here’s the link — https://www.theguardian.com/football/these-football-times/2018/jan/25/italian-football-premier-league-serie-a-language

    A wonderful, beautiful piece about the soul of Italian football. Be sure to take a look.

    Best, Bruce

    Reply

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