57 Comments

  1. Avatar Un po' di pepe
    March 22, 2018 @ 10:24 pm

    I was lucky. I bought my tiny place in Orsara di Puglia from my cousin so I didn’t have to go through the usual bureaucracy. It used to belong to our Nonno and cost less than my new car! Places are a lot cheaper in smaller towns. I hope Chandi finds a place soon. Ciao, Cristina

    Reply

  2. Avatar Un po' di pepe
    March 22, 2018 @ 10:24 pm

    I was lucky. I bought my tiny place in Orsara di Puglia from my cousin so I didn’t have to go through the usual bureaucracy. It used to belong to our Nonno and cost less than my new car! Places are a lot cheaper in smaller towns. I hope Chandi finds a place soon. Ciao, Cristina

    Reply

  3. John Henderson John Henderson
    March 23, 2018 @ 12:49 am

    Thanks for the comment. Yes, everyone seems to get homes from relatives. My girlfriend got her apartment from her father. She hasn’t paid a mortgage in years. How is life in Orsara di Puglia? I know some people who bought into the romantic notion of living in small-town Tuscany would be ideal. They were bored stiff and moved to Rome. But they were single and had no families.

    Reply

  4. Avatar Un po' di pepe
    March 23, 2018 @ 10:16 am

    I usually only spend the summer in Orsara, and this year I was also there in November. i live in Canada the rest of the time. The summer and festa times are wonderful in Orsara! Fresh air, good food and passeggiata in the evening, plus the population is bigger. The winter can be long and lonely, with not a lot to do, but my friends and relatives seem to do well there. Ciao, Cristina

    Reply

  5. Avatar Un po' di pepe
    March 23, 2018 @ 10:16 am

    I usually only spend the summer in Orsara, and this year I was also there in November. i live in Canada the rest of the time. The summer and festa times are wonderful in Orsara! Fresh air, good food and passeggiata in the evening, plus the population is bigger. The winter can be long and lonely, with not a lot to do, but my friends and relatives seem to do well there. Ciao, Cristina

    Reply

  6. John Henderson John Henderson
    March 23, 2018 @ 11:42 am

    Orsara sounds lovely. I’ll put it on my wish list.

    Reply

  7. Avatar Sue
    June 10, 2018 @ 10:32 am

    I am an American and we are selling our beautiful three bedroom three bath home that is in a little community right outside of Florence in the middle of Chianti. It has an American style kitchen and a beautiful tavern with a garden in the front and the back. Are usually is quite difficult to purchase property, however I do have one available if you know of anyone who is looking for a special place near Florence.

    Reply

    • Avatar Chandi
      June 11, 2018 @ 3:36 am

      Hi Sue,
      Whereabouts in Chianti is it? Can you email more info?
      chandi at paradise of exiles dot com

      Reply

      • Avatar joyce giraud
        November 25, 2019 @ 11:40 pm

        Do you have any pictures?

        Reply

    • Avatar cydney
      August 13, 2018 @ 9:44 am

      Hi Sue, I’d be interested in seeing the property you’re selling. We’re looking to buy something in Italy, but it must be very close to Florence. Your place sounds beautiful!
      Thanks!

      Reply

    • Avatar Anetta
      June 16, 2019 @ 9:04 am

      since the Euro came around the economy needs went really down they cannot afford to buy or sell, we have a beautiful house in Puglia on the Adriatic Sea so my mother put the house for sale 6 years ago my mother put the house for sale 6 years ago I am sorry you have to hear this but it’s just the wasted purchasing a house in Italy while the Euro still acting

      Reply

    • Avatar Omar Hannoon
      July 20, 2019 @ 5:06 am

      may you please send more info and photos if possible, and the req. price
      my big thanks to you
      Omar

      Reply

    • Avatar mujgan
      September 17, 2019 @ 4:47 am

      I am Turkish, I want to buy a house in Italy, but the city centers are expensive

      Reply

      • Avatar Phyllis Stercula
        September 17, 2019 @ 4:59 am

        true I bought it thinking it would stay in the family or I would rent it out

        Reply

  8. Avatar Sue
    June 10, 2018 @ 10:32 am

    I am an American and we are selling our beautiful three bedroom three bath home that is in a little community right outside of Florence in the middle of Chianti. It has an American style kitchen and a beautiful tavern with a garden in the front and the back. Are usually is quite difficult to purchase property, however I do have one available if you know of anyone who is looking for a special place near Florence.

    Reply

    • Avatar Chandi
      June 11, 2018 @ 3:36 am

      Hi Sue,
      Whereabouts in Chianti is it? Can you email more info?
      chandi at paradise of exiles dot com

      Reply

    • Avatar cydney
      August 13, 2018 @ 9:44 am

      Hi Sue, I’d be interested in seeing the property you’re selling. We’re looking to buy something in Italy, but it must be very close to Florence. Your place sounds beautiful!
      Thanks!

      Reply

    • Avatar Anetta
      June 16, 2019 @ 9:04 am

      since the Euro came around the economy needs went really down they cannot afford to buy or sell, we have a beautiful house in Puglia on the Adriatic Sea so my mother put the house for sale 6 years ago my mother put the house for sale 6 years ago I am sorry you have to hear this but it’s just the wasted purchasing a house in Italy while the Euro still acting

      Reply

    • Avatar Omar Hannoon
      July 20, 2019 @ 5:06 am

      may you please send more info and photos if possible, and the req. price
      my big thanks to you
      Omar

      Reply

    • Avatar mujgan
      September 17, 2019 @ 4:47 am

      I am Turkish, I want to buy a house in Italy, but the city centers are expensive

      Reply

      • John Henderson John Henderson
        September 17, 2019 @ 4:57 am

        They’re expensive outside the center, too. What’s worse is they’re even harder to resell later.

        Reply

        • Avatar Phyllis Stercula
          September 17, 2019 @ 4:59 am

          true I bought it thinking it would stay in the family or I would rent it out

          Reply

  9. Avatar GIOVANNI DE PETRIS
    October 22, 2018 @ 6:31 am

    Sorry about your experience
    I sold in Abruzzo a beautiful small renaissance home, in a protected village (protected from speculation) I wish I had heard of these struggles before!
    Anyhow: rules are different in every nations, I bought and sold in the USA and sometimes the USA can be very painful especially with the new laws for loans etc
    But rules guarantee you , in the USA there are too few and loose ones at that: I saw homes with cracks in walls, mold under kitchen cabinets that obstructed a vent (GASP) etc etc
    so not so different where one is armed with experience for the various locals.
    Please understand Italian homes are centuries hold: don t expect Beverly hills and spacious this and that: there was not even a good toilet in the 1400 !
    the fun is in making it yours and some have been reappointed by great architects: good hunting
    PS I love Abruzzo, stop focusing on the usual regions, you miss out, check Marche Abruzzo Molise, Puglia the appenine in Emilia Romagna
    M Goodness: GORGEOUS places everywhere
    Ciao Amici!

    Reply

    • Avatar Phyllis Stercula
      February 7, 2019 @ 6:14 am

      We just bought a 1500 Sq Ft. apartment in Abruzzo. It is a little village between the Adriatic Sea and Gran Sasso mountains. My relatives all live there and the house cost less than a car. 25,000 euros. I paid another 7,000 plus for feeds and closing. The apartment needs renovation but hope to get started soon. From my balcony I can see the mountains and from by kitchen window I can see a little of the sea. I had them remove all from the apartment before settlement including the kitchen and I picked a new kitchen before returning to the US for $14,000 euros which includes all appliances, countertop, faucet, sink. This is a big kitchen by Italian standards and 13 meters. You are right that Italians do no like open floor plans as the architect was trying to talk me out of putting my sink at the window and said I should add a distinction between the kitchen and sitting room/family room. All very interesting. I can’t say it was a bad experience however I did have cousins who were involved all the way. The only thing that took me off course was the fact that I bought the house for one price but it was valued higher when I got to settlement and as a result I had to pay more taxes and I was also told that I could not qualify for the “first Home Benefits” in Italy and pay low taxes because I was not an Italian citizen. This was not told to me in advance and I was really surprised. None of this was told to me upfront which left a bad taste in my mouth and a little confusion issues with my cousins who took it personal that I questioned it and did not trust them. It was interesting to say the least but overall I so far am happy that we did this and look forward to the remaining process.

      Reply

      • Avatar Anthony Alioto
        July 17, 2019 @ 6:53 pm

        The Prima Casa “discount” is available to Italian Citizens, not necessarily living in Italy. Example, we have a client residing for many years in NY, born in Italy with an Italian passport, who just acquired title to property in the family home town in Italy. She got the discount, Prima Casa, on her recurring property taxes.

        Reply

  10. Avatar GIOVANNI DE PETRIS
    October 22, 2018 @ 6:31 am

    Sorry about your experience
    I sold in Abruzzo a beautiful small renaissance home, in a protected village (protected from speculation) I wish I had heard of these struggles before!
    Anyhow: rules are different in every nations, I bought and sold in the USA and sometimes the USA can be very painful especially with the new laws for loans etc
    But rules guarantee you , in the USA there are too few and loose ones at that: I saw homes with cracks in walls, mold under kitchen cabinets that obstructed a vent (GASP) etc etc
    so not so different where one is armed with experience for the various locals.
    Please understand Italian homes are centuries hold: don t expect Beverly hills and spacious this and that: there was not even a good toilet in the 1400 !
    the fun is in making it yours and some have been reappointed by great architects: good hunting
    PS I love Abruzzo, stop focusing on the usual regions, you miss out, check Marche Abruzzo Molise, Puglia the appenine in Emilia Romagna
    M Goodness: GORGEOUS places everywhere
    Ciao Amici!

    Reply

    • Avatar Phyllis Stercula
      February 7, 2019 @ 6:14 am

      We just bought a 1500 Sq Ft. apartment in Abruzzo. It is a little village between the Adriatic Sea and Gran Sasso mountains. My relatives all live there and the house cost less than a car. 25,000 euros. I paid another 7,000 plus for feeds and closing. The apartment needs renovation but hope to get started soon. From my balcony I can see the mountains and from by kitchen window I can see a little of the sea. I had them remove all from the apartment before settlement including the kitchen and I picked a new kitchen before returning to the US for $14,000 euros which includes all appliances, countertop, faucet, sink. This is a big kitchen by Italian standards and 13 meters. You are right that Italians do no like open floor plans as the architect was trying to talk me out of putting my sink at the window and said I should add a distinction between the kitchen and sitting room/family room. All very interesting. I can’t say it was a bad experience however I did have cousins who were involved all the way. The only thing that took me off course was the fact that I bought the house for one price but it was valued higher when I got to settlement and as a result I had to pay more taxes and I was also told that I could not qualify for the “first Home Benefits” in Italy and pay low taxes because I was not an Italian citizen. This was not told to me in advance and I was really surprised. None of this was told to me upfront which left a bad taste in my mouth and a little confusion issues with my cousins who took it personal that I questioned it and did not trust them. It was interesting to say the least but overall I so far am happy that we did this and look forward to the remaining process.

      Reply

      • Avatar Anthony Alioto
        July 17, 2019 @ 6:53 pm

        The Prima Casa “discount” is available to Italian Citizens, not necessarily living in Italy. Example, we have a client residing for many years in NY, born in Italy with an Italian passport, who just acquired title to property in the family home town in Italy. She got the discount, Prima Casa, on her recurring property taxes.

        Reply

  11. Avatar Kate
    January 3, 2019 @ 1:14 pm

    I am just looking to buy some small house in Italy and the project is not to exceed 10.000 GBP!
    Of course including renovation and all costs related. We will see how I go.

    Reply

    • Avatar Phyllis Stercula
      February 7, 2019 @ 6:29 am

      I agree, unless you plan to spend hundreds of thousands even if you find one for 10,000 pounds, it would be very expensive to restore or may not even be possible to restore. be careful…

      Reply

  12. Avatar Kate
    January 3, 2019 @ 1:14 pm

    I am just looking to buy some small house in Italy and the project is not to exceed 10.000 GBP!
    Of course including renovation and all costs related. We will see how I go.

    Reply

    • John Henderson John Henderson
      January 4, 2019 @ 12:04 am

      What is GBP? British pounds? You want to find a house in Italy for 10,000 pounds. That’s not possible so I’m assuming GBP means something else.

      Reply

      • Avatar Phyllis Stercula
        February 7, 2019 @ 6:29 am

        I agree, unless you plan to spend hundreds of thousands even if you find one for 10,000 pounds, it would be very expensive to restore or may not even be possible to restore. be careful…

        Reply

  13. John Henderson John Henderson
    February 8, 2019 @ 2:57 am

    Thanks for the comment and advice, Phyllis. The amount of work involved in renovating property here makes pouring money into the black hole of a rented apartment seem less of a waste.

    Reply

    • Avatar Phyllis Stercula
      February 8, 2019 @ 5:52 am

      yes I have to agree because yearly taxes are very low in Italy, I think it is a good investment to buy especially now prices are low although it is a bit of a hassle to renovate but if you find the right people and take it slow, it can be done and much more reasonable than in the USA. I will have to see how it goes as I have not started the renovation yet, John.

      Reply

  14. Avatar Phyllis Stercula
    February 8, 2019 @ 5:52 am

    yes I have to agree because yearly taxes are very low in Italy, I think it is a good investment to buy especially now prices are low although it is a bit of a hassle to renovate but if you find the right people and take it slow, it can be done and much more reasonable than in the USA. I will have to see how it goes as I have not started the renovation yet, John.

    Reply

  15. Avatar Nik
    May 15, 2019 @ 1:34 pm

    What bank would provide a mortgage to an American? I walked into a bank in Italy and they said they won’t give me a mortgage unless I work and live in Italy. I’m struggling to find a bank that will provide me with a mortgage, can anybody point me to the right direction?

    Reply

    • Avatar Nik
      May 16, 2019 @ 7:59 am

      Thank you I did both of those!

      Reply

    • Avatar Gioran
      July 14, 2019 @ 8:11 pm

      The same with the USA. No banks will mortgage any home unless you work and live here, plus they will not mortgage any home outside of the USA, even you live and work in the USA, or have a property to put as security for your finance.

      Reply

      • Avatar Anthony Alioto
        July 17, 2019 @ 6:44 pm

        Not always true. There are circumstances were US banks with your excellent credit references will allow a mortgage. I have seen this a few times over the years

        Reply

  16. Avatar Nik
    May 15, 2019 @ 1:34 pm

    What bank would provide a mortgage to an American? I walked into a bank in Italy and they said they won’t give me a mortgage unless I work and live in Italy. I’m struggling to find a bank that will provide me with a mortgage, can anybody point me to the right direction?

    Reply

    • John Henderson John Henderson
      May 16, 2019 @ 3:50 am

      Write Chandi Wyatt directly or to Expats Living in Rome Facebook page.

      Reply

      • Avatar Nik
        May 16, 2019 @ 7:59 am

        Thank you I did both of those!

        Reply

    • Avatar Gioran
      July 14, 2019 @ 8:11 pm

      The same with the USA. No banks will mortgage any home unless you work and live here, plus they will not mortgage any home outside of the USA, even you live and work in the USA, or have a property to put as security for your finance.

      Reply

      • Avatar Anthony Alioto
        July 17, 2019 @ 6:44 pm

        Not always true. There are circumstances were US banks with your excellent credit references will allow a mortgage. I have seen this a few times over the years

        Reply

  17. Avatar Gabriella
    July 9, 2019 @ 9:19 am

    It is surprising to me to notice that you didnt’t take in consideration Sicily… amazing blog, though

    Reply

  18. Avatar Gabriella
    July 9, 2019 @ 9:19 am

    It is surprising to me to notice that you didnt’t take in consideration Sicily… amazing blog, though

    Reply

  19. Avatar Elisabetta
    July 25, 2019 @ 7:41 am

    I’m buy a house to Italy Sicily.
    Real estate agent advised us that because we are non-residence we’re going to be paying a tax of 9% on the property tax .
    Of course this is a one time fee.don’t you find it too expensive. I do have a doer citizenship and I do have a European passport too . but I’m non-residents in Italy can anybody advise me about this .

    Reply

    • Avatar Anthony Alioto
      September 17, 2019 @ 8:54 am

      9% is a transfer fee, not a property tax

      Reply

  20. Avatar Elisabetta
    July 25, 2019 @ 7:41 am

    I’m buy a house to Italy Sicily.
    Real estate agent advised us that because we are non-residence we’re going to be paying a tax of 9% on the property tax .
    Of course this is a one time fee.don’t you find it too expensive. I do have a doer citizenship and I do have a European passport too . but I’m non-residents in Italy can anybody advise me about this .

    Reply

    • Avatar Anthony Alioto
      September 17, 2019 @ 8:54 am

      9% is a transfer fee, not a property tax

      Reply

  21. Avatar Anthony Alioto
    September 17, 2019 @ 8:52 am

    I read through some of the posts and have a few observations on the formalities of transferring property in Italy. There were a couple of comments that stood out as totally misleading but will not get into details. Suffice it so say the following:
    1. One cannot buy property if one of the co-owners is deceased, i,e, the property report is essential to see who the owner(s) are. Someone on title born in 1910 (example). Stop. Fix this.
    2. Filing succession documents removes the deceased party.
    3. You did not have Italian citizenship to buy
    4. Selling property requires passing through the recording agent (il notaio) with both buy and seller(s) present. Of course, a dully authorized Procura (power of attorney) may be used, Of course, it must be in Italian.
    5. “property tax” of 9% is incorrectly stated. It is a one-time transfer fee, not a tax!

    Summary: one acquires title to property by:
    a. succession (inheriting… dichiarazione di successione)
    b. sale (atto di compravendita)
    c. gifting (atto di donazione)
    d. renouncing one’s ownership is difficult and a times impossible

    In short, do not state “avoiding the bureaucracy”. There is always the right way,

    Anthony Alioto
    http://www.italianlaw.net
    San Francisco / Roma

    Reply

  22. Avatar Anthony Alioto
    September 17, 2019 @ 8:52 am

    I read through some of the posts and have a few observations on the formalities of transferring property in Italy. There were a couple of comments that stood out as totally misleading but will not get into details. Suffice it so say the following:
    1. One cannot buy property if one of the co-owners is deceased, i,e, the property report is essential to see who the owner(s) are. Someone on title born in 1910 (example). Stop. Fix this.
    2. Filing succession documents removes the deceased party.
    3. You did not have Italian citizenship to buy
    4. Selling property requires passing through the recording agent (il notaio) with both buy and seller(s) present. Of course, a dully authorized Procura (power of attorney) may be used, Of course, it must be in Italian.
    5. “property tax” of 9% is incorrectly stated. It is a one-time transfer fee, not a tax!

    Summary: one acquires title to property by:
    a. succession (inheriting… dichiarazione di successione)
    b. sale (atto di compravendita)
    c. gifting (atto di donazione)
    d. renouncing one’s ownership is difficult and a times impossible

    In short, do not state “avoiding the bureaucracy”. There is always the right way,

    Anthony Alioto
    http://www.italianlaw.net
    San Francisco / Roma

    Reply

  23. Avatar Charlene
    October 16, 2019 @ 12:49 pm

    I want to return the province my family is from – Abruzzo – and buy a home for approx 300,000 Euro. I prefer the countryside. Am I to assume that the property will no increase in value from the comments left on this blog and it would be difficult to sell?

    Reply

  24. Avatar Charlene
    October 16, 2019 @ 12:49 pm

    I want to return the province my family is from – Abruzzo – and buy a home for approx 300,000 Euro. I prefer the countryside. Am I to assume that the property will no increase in value from the comments left on this blog and it would be difficult to sell?

    Reply

    • John Henderson John Henderson
      October 17, 2019 @ 12:35 am

      Yes, that is correct. I’ve been told never to buy in Italy. It’s hard to find anything affordable and when you do buy they’re impossible to resell. Remember, Italy is going through its biggest recession since World War II. No one has money to buy houses here. If you’re lucky, maybe an American expat will buy it.

      Reply

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