7 Comments

  1. Avatar gooddayrome
    November 3, 2015 @ 11:43 pm

    John, I laughed so hard I nearly squirted tea out my nose! We’ve all been there. I once stopped by the Diplomatic Post Office at teh embassy to pick up a heavy package. The Italian workers, who were very patient with my efforts at Italian, asked me what it was. I said “E’ un culo per mia nipota,” at which they doubled up in laughter. Seems I had said it was an ass (as in arse, backside, butt), when actually it was “una culla,” a crib. I am in a “scambio” with an Italian as well. She is fluent in English, but like your partner, wants to refine and improve. It’s a great way learn.

    Reply

  2. Avatar gooddayrome
    November 3, 2015 @ 11:43 pm

    John, I laughed so hard I nearly squirted tea out my nose! We’ve all been there. I once stopped by the Diplomatic Post Office at teh embassy to pick up a heavy package. The Italian workers, who were very patient with my efforts at Italian, asked me what it was. I said “E’ un culo per mia nipota,” at which they doubled up in laughter. Seems I had said it was an ass (as in arse, backside, butt), when actually it was “una culla,” a crib. I am in a “scambio” with an Italian as well. She is fluent in English, but like your partner, wants to refine and improve. It’s a great way learn.

    Reply

  3. John Henderson John Henderson
    November 3, 2015 @ 11:52 pm

    In 2002 my then-girlfriend and I were picking olives in Tuscany. Picking olives is easy. You stand on short ladders and pull olives into boxes. The first time my girlfriend filled one, she asked the head of the orchard for another box. But instead of saying “scatola” she said something similar that just happened to be the local dialect for the word “cock.” Of course, being Italian, he still tried to give it to her. Just kidding. He did laugh, though.

    Reply

  4. Avatar italianpenpals.org webmaster
    November 5, 2015 @ 5:33 am

    Great article, I will link it from my site, let me know if that is not ok.
    There is a typo that can confuse other learners: you say scambio linguistico, not linguistica, masculine ends in o.
    For a very simple explanation of gender see http://italianpenpals.org/content/italian-nouns-gender-and-number-quick-and-easy-overview

    Reply

  5. Avatar italianpenpals.org webmaster
    November 5, 2015 @ 5:33 am

    Great article, I will link it from my site, let me know if that is not ok.
    There is a typo that can confuse other learners: you say scambio linguistico, not linguistica, masculine ends in o.
    For a very simple explanation of gender see http://italianpenpals.org/content/italian-nouns-gender-and-number-quick-and-easy-overview

    Reply

  6. Avatar Giorgio
    September 6, 2018 @ 11:25 pm

    Very good read.
    And finally another one who finds understanding a language they’re learning HARDER than speaking or writing.

    I’ve been asking around what is hardest when learning a language, the comprehension or the speaking, and the answer is inevitably the second. For me it’s the other way round. I’ve been learning Georgian language (living in Tbilisi for a year) and while I can slowly read and speak OKish (if my limited vocabulary allows me), when I listen it’s a disaster…

    Reply

  7. Avatar Giorgio
    September 6, 2018 @ 11:25 pm

    Very good read.
    And finally another one who finds understanding a language they’re learning HARDER than speaking or writing.

    I’ve been asking around what is hardest when learning a language, the comprehension or the speaking, and the answer is inevitably the second. For me it’s the other way round. I’ve been learning Georgian language (living in Tbilisi for a year) and while I can slowly read and speak OKish (if my limited vocabulary allows me), when I listen it’s a disaster…

    Reply

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