16 Comments

  1. Avatar Lisa Rosenberg
    November 2, 2018 @ 10:09 am

    Hai propio ragione, sono d’accordo con tutto quello che hai scritto!

    Reply

  2. Avatar Lisa Rosenberg
    November 2, 2018 @ 10:10 am

    Bravo!

    Reply

  3. Avatar planetmargo
    November 2, 2018 @ 1:34 pm

    Awesome article! I grew up in the Foreign Service and we had 9 overseas moves over 20 years. It really gave me a different perspective, and I can really relate to your experience.

    Reply

  4. Avatar Geoff stephenson
    November 2, 2018 @ 1:54 pm

    What a cracking article. I especially relate to poor Tunisia, where I had some wonderful holidays. I was there when 9/11 was happening and they were as shocked and saddened as other nationalities

    Reply

  5. Avatar jack h eberhart
    November 3, 2018 @ 3:00 pm

    Hey cuz! I always get a kick out of your articles. This was a special edition. Thanks. Your picture with the Laotian monk reminded me of a young Morrie Henderson. I never knew he was so cranky, and by the way Mary Ellen was a better cook than you give her credit for. You were just a picky eater as a kid.
    Best wishes, Jack

    Reply

  6. Avatar awtytravels
    November 4, 2018 @ 7:30 am

    The late Anthony Bourdain said, more than once I believe, that he wished more Americans had passports, and I see a lot of what he said in your post, John. And I agree with you wholeheartedly; not only that, but I wish that more Italians went abroad and did things (not just sex tourism in Kenya/Cuba/Madagascar) abroad. I have one uncle, blind since birth, who loves to travel. He says “You learn more in a trip than in a 100 books”. He’s absolutely right, and so are you.

    By the way, 15 days of leave a year should be a human rights infringement, but that’s my lazy-ass nature talking!

    Fabrizio

    Reply

  7. Avatar awtytravels
    November 4, 2018 @ 7:30 am

    The late Anthony Bourdain said, more than once I believe, that he wished more Americans had passports, and I see a lot of what he said in your post, John. And I agree with you wholeheartedly; not only that, but I wish that more Italians went abroad and did things (not just sex tourism in Kenya/Cuba/Madagascar) abroad. I have one uncle, blind since birth, who loves to travel. He says “You learn more in a trip than in a 100 books”. He’s absolutely right, and so are you.

    By the way, 15 days of leave a year should be a human rights infringement, but that’s my lazy-ass nature talking!

    Fabrizio

    Reply

  8. Avatar Weiss
    November 6, 2018 @ 5:15 am

    How ironic! I think every American should live abroad for a while, because then they’ll go home and vote Republican! They can see how poor many of the other “first-world” countries are, how primitive their health-care systems are (because they’re govt-run and “free”), how comparatively lousy their universities are (ditto), how underpaid and yet insanely overtaxed they all are, how desperate many people are to learn English in the hopes that one day they can emigrate… and how much the natives admire President Trump, whom the locals in my city speak of with awe and respect.

    Reply

  9. Avatar walter
    November 7, 2018 @ 8:24 pm

    You can travel widely but still live within the narrow confines of a closed mind. You bleat on for paragraphs about your own worldly experiences, and your love and tolerance for all the many fascinating peoples and cultures of this world (in contrast to the millions of your ignorant American countrymen). But when one poster presents a different viewpoint, you instantly start screaming that he is the ignorant racist bigot. And the legions of desperate homeless that you see in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and elsewhere in the USA are the product of failed leftist Democratic run cities. These are your welcoming sanctuary cities. So telling that you cannot extend your own boundless curiosity and deep appreciation for all the variety of human existence to your own people.

    Reply

    • John Henderson John Henderson
      November 8, 2018 @ 9:12 am

      I ripped the reader because he was ripping countries that have the audacity to help others who can’t help themselves. The man was criticizing countries for being poor (a colossal lie) because of their high taxes. As for the homeless, yes, the Democrat-run cities in the West are susceptible to homeless because they actually care. They’re trying to help. They accommodate those in need. I mentioned them as an illustration of the disparity in wealth in America, that it isn’t the utopia the Republican Party thinks it is. I am not judgmental. I am only judgmental against people who are judgmental and the most judgmental person on the planet is the Donald Trump supporter.

      Reply

  10. Avatar walter
    November 7, 2018 @ 8:24 pm

    You can travel widely but still live within the narrow confines of a closed mind. You bleat on for paragraphs about your own worldly experiences, and your love and tolerance for all the many fascinating peoples and cultures of this world (in contrast to the millions of your ignorant American countrymen). But when one poster presents a different viewpoint, you instantly start screaming that he is the ignorant racist bigot. And the legions of desperate homeless that you see in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and elsewhere in the USA are the product of failed leftist Democratic run cities. These are your welcoming sanctuary cities. So telling that you cannot extend your own boundless curiosity and deep appreciation for all the variety of human existence to your own people.

    Reply

  11. Avatar Mary
    December 4, 2018 @ 6:37 pm

    I truly appreciate your work – and your excellent personal advice on travel! (which I still owe you a glass of wine for…) One of your sentences in this article motivated me to respond: “An incredible 11 percent have never left their home state, according to CheapOair, a travel website.” I know these people. I live among them every day. I live in a county where I personally know several people who have not travelled more than 50 miles from home – ever – in their entire lives (and they are not young). Loving travel, as you do, and having learned many of the lessons that you wrote about, I found this astounding when I moved here. Then I started to work among the poor after a quarter of a century working elsewhere. I looked around and realized that I had a lot to learn. I write my comments not to you (because I am fairly certain you “get it”) – but generally. We often fall into the trap that our personal perspective sets for us.

    You and I had the benefit of a good education. Maybe we had someone (parent or not) who encouraged our natural curiosity. Perhaps, we used our library card as our first means of exploration to foreign lands. Most of my clients (and their children) haven’t had such luxury. Their lives as far back as they can remember have been very different. It’s likely there isn’t a working car to get to the library – even if there was, mom/dad would have the car at work and the teens are taking care of their younger sibs at home after getting off the bus…there’s no money for the $350 fee for a drivers license or even the $50 for a state ID so that the college hopeful teen can use it to take the SAT.

    Financial limitations do define our dreams. Such limitations define our available time, educational opportunities and I think, even our creative thought capability. When one is focused on obtaining the basic needs on Maslow’s hierarchy, it truly is impossible to think beyond the immediate future and it’s unmet demands.

    I wholeheartedly agree with you regarding the benefits of travel – but we have to be careful not to paint with strokes that are too broad. I know that the target of some of your comments is not the truly poor – but the willfully ignorant. Nonetheless, here’s my question (challenge) – how can we bring the wonder of travel and the wisdom found within it to those who are not nearly as fortunate as we are?

    Reply

    • Avatar Mary
      December 10, 2018 @ 5:24 am

      Hi, I live in a small town rural area of Michigan (I encourage you to read “the Other Side of the River by Alex Kotlowitz). In our area, the disparity between the “haves” and “have nots” is remarkable and more pronounced because of the smaller population (and other reasons) – we have about 120 thousand in our entire county. Honestly, most of my clients are so preoccupied with trying to put food on the table that I’m not sure that they even think much about other countries, let alone travel there – it just wouldn’t cross their minds. But for them, America certainly has not been particularly kind and will likely get worse.

      The worst traveler to me is the one who complains because things are different than the US and they can’t have the food (or whatever) that they want or they bitch about how inconvenient things are for them. Or, those who do zero research into the customs of a destination and then complain that the *—–* are “so rude”. These travelers then use these things to support their rejection of an entire culture and to reinforce their already narrow minded view that America is “first”. They come home and tell all of their friends about how the buildings and art were beautiful while rejecting the entire population and governmental regulations that built and preserved the buildings and art that they appreciated so much.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: