5 Comments

  1. Avatar Laurel
    May 11, 2018 @ 9:04 am

    In ten visits to Venezia we have found many °back doors° where tourists seldom tread, but have not (yet) made it to the Lido. Next time!

    Reply

  2. Avatar Laurel
    May 11, 2018 @ 9:04 am

    In ten visits to Venezia we have found many °back doors° where tourists seldom tread, but have not (yet) made it to the Lido. Next time!

    Reply

  3. Avatar Kathy
    May 13, 2018 @ 9:58 am

    Your article brought up so many thoughts and emotions for me. I’ve owned a home and have lived in a tourist town in the Caifornia Sierra Mountains since 1997. The influx of tourists on the weekends and holidays is really challenging, particularly for me since my work livelihood does not depend on it. My Italian cousins own a flat on the Lido across the lagoon from Venice which you highlight in the article. I visit them there most years, staying in Dorsoduro, my favorite sestiere. Like at home I resent “i turisti” (of course I too am one in Venice). The key is not acting like a tourist. I dress respectfully and smartly. When my husband or best friend travel with me, we walk single file on narrow streets so residents can easily pass. I pay to eat in dining establishments, not hang out on the streets blocking passageways. Like where I live pleasantries go a long way. Just because one pays money to be there doesn’t give license to be rude or insensitive to culture. I’ve lead a couple tours in years past and prior to arriving in Italy gave focus to learning simple phraseology…saying buongiorgno, salve, etc., and alway asking “permeso” before barging into a store or touching a piece of fruit. I could go on and on as I have so much love for Venice. I have my hidden gems and can navigate away from the crowds while there on vacation, but have empathy for the Venetians who struggle with mass tourism on a daily basis without solutions.

    Reply

  4. Avatar Kathy
    May 13, 2018 @ 9:58 am

    Your article brought up so many thoughts and emotions for me. I’ve owned a home and have lived in a tourist town in the Caifornia Sierra Mountains since 1997. The influx of tourists on the weekends and holidays is really challenging, particularly for me since my work livelihood does not depend on it. My Italian cousins own a flat on the Lido across the lagoon from Venice which you highlight in the article. I visit them there most years, staying in Dorsoduro, my favorite sestiere. Like at home I resent “i turisti” (of course I too am one in Venice). The key is not acting like a tourist. I dress respectfully and smartly. When my husband or best friend travel with me, we walk single file on narrow streets so residents can easily pass. I pay to eat in dining establishments, not hang out on the streets blocking passageways. Like where I live pleasantries go a long way. Just because one pays money to be there doesn’t give license to be rude or insensitive to culture. I’ve lead a couple tours in years past and prior to arriving in Italy gave focus to learning simple phraseology…saying buongiorgno, salve, etc., and alway asking “permeso” before barging into a store or touching a piece of fruit. I could go on and on as I have so much love for Venice. I have my hidden gems and can navigate away from the crowds while there on vacation, but have empathy for the Venetians who struggle with mass tourism on a daily basis without solutions.

    Reply

  5. John Henderson John Henderson
    May 15, 2018 @ 6:41 am

    Thanks so much for the nice email. I’m glad some responsible travelers still treat Venice with respect. I always will.

    Reply

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